Buried oil pipelines in Cheshire

Works have recently been completed that required sections of the buried oil pipelines in Cheshire to be exposed.  The pipeline’s depth of cover was measured and the works were undertaken to ensure that there was adequate cover to protect the landowner and contractors who may be operating in the pipeline’s vicinity.

As part of BPA’s regular line walking, monitoring and surveying activities, it was decided that this section of buried oil pipeline in Cheshire should be excavated so that a section of the high pressure oil pipeline could be replaced at a greater depth.

High-pressure oil and gas pipelines are laid in welded steel sections, at a nominal depth of at least one meter.  BPA’s buried pipelines carry oil at pressures of up to fifteen hundred PSI, that’s at least 50 times the pressure of an average car tyre, and can pose a risk to people or the environment if they are damaged.

To prevent against accident, contractors working near to pipelines have a legal duty of care to protect their personnel, the general public and the environment when operating in the vicinity of the pipeline.  As such anyone working within 3 meters either side of the pipeline is required to contact the pipeline operator to ensure compliance with legislation.

When contacting BPA, the team will ask for details regarding the proposed works and will support landowners by outlining all the required health and safety requirements.  Landowners or contractors who don’t inform landowners not only risk breaking the law, but could potentially be putting someone’s life at risk.

Once informed of works on the buried oil pipelines, BPA can support landowners or contractors by providing maps that show the exact location of the pipeline and help mark out its route for any activities.  There is no charge for this service and the pipeline operator will always deal with a landowner in an emergency.

Exposing the buried oil pipeline in Cheshire, clearly shows that pipelines can often be found at a nominal depth of only one metre.  It also shows that pipelines often do not run in straight lines between field markers and that landowners should contact the pipeline operator if in doubt.

If landowners or contractors have any questions regarding the pipelines that run under their land, please contact a member of the BPA’s Lands Team and they would be more than happy to assist.